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"Then I say the Earth belongs to each generation during its course, fully and in its right no generation can contract debts greater than may be paid during the course of its existence"

Thomas Jefferson, September 6, 1789

"If there are to be problems, may they come during my life-time so that I can resolve them and give my children the chance of a good life."

Kenyan proverb

"History teaches us that men and nations behave wisely once they have exhausted all other alternatives"

Abba Eban

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Special sessions

SPECIAL SESSION: Integrated Project Management towards Sustainable Construction
Session resume:

Globally, the development industry is experiencing unprecedented shifts in technology, materials, human resources and automation. From the headquarters of multi-national corporations through to small to medium enterprises, the implications of such disruption is experienced in the calls for project tenders, scheduling and resourcing expectations, and increasing demands with regard to low-carbon metrics, low-toxic materials, waste management, and onsite environmental stewardship.

Over the last several years in particular, conferences and forums within this sector have been focused on what it means to practice ‘construction management’ in the 21st Century, with exciting insights into new systems and processes that are empowering stakeholders in transforming projects towards on-time, on-budget outcomes that are good for planet.

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Dr. Sherif Mostafa
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Dr Mostafa has more than 10 years of industry experience in delivering engineering projects. He has worked in positions including consulting engineer, and project and planning engineer in the areas of residential and commercial buildings, asset maintenance and project management. He is a certified Lean Six Sigma Green Belt (LSSGB), Scrum Master (CSM), a professional engineer with the Institution of Engineers Australia and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (UK). Through his volunteer roles with the Project Management Institute (PMI) (Melbourne, Sydney, Queensland and Adelaide Chapters) and PrefabAUS in Melbourne and Adelaide, Sherif makes a significant contribution to the construction and project management professions.
Dr Mostafa completed his PhD in Construction Engineering Management from the University of South Australia in 2016. He has been working in the higher education industry where he contributes to directing, coordinating, researching and teaching construction and project management, and engineering management courses. He is the Program Director of Bachelor of Construction Management (Hons) at Griffith University. Sherif’s research portfolio comprises PhD thesis supervisions and conducting industrial research projects. He has an outstanding track record of high-quality publications. Moreover, he is actively initiating research ideas that have attracted industry professional, interdisciplinary, and multidisciplinary partners.
Prof. Cheryl Desha
Griffith University
Nathan, Australia
Associate Professor Cheryl Desha has been working for the past two decades, with colleagues in Australia and overseas to build capacity for place-based (geospatial), nature-loving (biophilic), and nature-inspired (biomimetic) design. This includes capacity building for whole system thinking, resource productivity, decoupling and sustainable business practice, to foster urban nature for resilient and liveable cities. Her career goal is to facilitate sustainable development by empowering society with emerging language, knowledge and skills related to achieving sustainable solutions. Through her leadership roles within the International Society of Digital Earth as leader of the Australian Chapter’s research node, the Energy Efficiency Council of Australia, she advocates for interdisciplinary problem-solving and methods towards breakthrough solutions. She has co-authored more than 100 publications including 7 books, 2 of which have been listed in the top 40 publications by the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership. She has co-led four projects within the Sustainable Built Environment National Research Centre and managed more than AUD $1.5 million of research projects in behaviour change towards sustainable development. In 2019 Griffith University joined the UN-GGIM Academic Network and is a member of ProSPER.Net.
Ms. Samantha Hayes
Bioneering Australia
Brisbane, Australia
Samantha is a sustainability professional with extensive experience in delivering strategic organisational and project-level sustainability outcomes across multiple industries. Currently pursuing a PhD in Biomimetic Engineering, Samantha also holds a Masters in Environmental Law from the University of Sydney, as well as a Bachelor of Environmental Management (Sustainable Development) with First Class Honours from the University of Queensland.
In her previous role, Samantha was responsible for establishing and leading the energy and sustainability functions of an international engineering contracting company with over $13 billion of work in hand and up to 200 project sites at any given time. Samantha has developed and implemented award winning energy management; environmental and sustainability strategies to address key risks and opportunities across the mining, construction, telecommunications and infrastructure services sectors. In addition to strategy and governance, Samantha has significant experience in the delivery of detailed project level sustainability outcomes, including comprehensive modelling, measurement and reporting.

Invited papers (4)
SPECIAL SESSION: Role of geospatial technologies and innovation in smart urban development
Session resume:

The 2019 Global Report on Sustainable Development foresees that if urban and peri-urban development continues at the current pace, by 2050 70% of the world population and 85% of the global economic outputs will occur in cities.   For cities to be liveable spaces under this prediction better management of urban growth to ensure sustainable urbanisation will be needed.

Business as usual for urban growth is no longer possible. The United Nations 2019 report on the advances of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development points - under SDG 11 on making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable - that at present  vast majority of urban residents continue breathing poor-quality air, and have limited access to transport and open public spaces.  Furthermore, it notes that urban areas are expanding at a faster rate than their populations, urban densities of cities are declining, and this creates profound repercussions for environmental sustainability at the local and regional scales. 

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Prof. Cheryl Desha
Griffith University
Nathan, Australia
Associate Professor Cheryl Desha has been working for the past two decades, with colleagues in Australia and overseas to build capacity for place-based (geospatial), nature-loving (biophilic), and nature-inspired (biomimetic) design. This includes capacity building for whole system thinking, resource productivity, decoupling and sustainable business practice, to foster urban nature for resilient and liveable cities. Her career goal is to facilitate sustainable development by empowering society with emerging language, knowledge and skills related to achieving sustainable solutions. Through her leadership roles within the International Society of Digital Earth as leader of the Australian Chapter’s research node, the Energy Efficiency Council of Australia, she advocates for interdisciplinary problem-solving and methods towards breakthrough solutions. She has co-authored more than 100 publications including 7 books, 2 of which have been listed in the top 40 publications by the Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership. She has co-led four projects within the Sustainable Built Environment National Research Centre and managed more than AUD $1.5 million of research projects in behaviour change towards sustainable development. In 2019 Griffith University joined the UN-GGIM Academic Network and is a member of ProSPER.Net.
Prof. Graciela Metternicht
UNSW Sydney
Sydney, Australia
Professor Graciela Metternicht Graciela Metternicht is Professor at the University of New South Wales Sydney, with expertise in applications of geospatial technologies for environmental management and sustainability, including the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Land degradation adviser to the UN Global Environmental Facility (STAP), she is also Deputy Chair of the Australian Academy of Sciences National Committee of Geographical Sciences. Co-leads the Dryland Ecosystems Specialist Group of the IUCN Commission on Ecosystem Management, and is member of the Science Policy Interface of the UN Convention to Combat Desertification. 2018 awardee of the President’s International Initiative, Chinese Academy of Science. Past appointments include Regional Coordinator of Early Warning and Assessment at UN Environment. She has published over 100 scientific papers in international journals and conference proceedings, and has attracted research funding through Australian competitive grants (ARC and others), international grants and research contracts.

Invited papers (3)
SPECIAL SESSION: Renewable Energy Integration and Microgrid Technology
Session resume:

In order to decarbonise the Australian economy, more and more renewable energy has been integrated into power grids by grid-connected power electronics technologies. However, due to low inertia of power electronics devices and intermittent nature of renewable energy, there are a host of challenges for the renewable energy integration into power grids.

The aim of this special session is to provide some solutions to these challenges. One of the solutions is microgrid technologies. Therefore, the contributions to this special session are expected to provide the latest results in optimisation, control and management of microgrid and its real applications. Topics to be covered in this special session include, but are not limited to:

  • Renewable energy integration technologies;
  • Microgrid energy optimisation and scheduling;
  • Microgrid management systems;
  • Microgrid controller design;
  • Virtual inertia control in microgrids;
  • Energy storage battery management system;
  • Cooperation control of networked microgrids;
  • Distributed control of networked microgrids.
Prof. Fuwen Yang
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Fuwen Yang received the Ph.D. degrees in control engineering from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, in 1990.

He is currently an Associate Professor at Griffith Univeristy, Australia. Before joining Griffith, he was a Research Fellow at Brunel University and King’s College London, UK, a Professor at Fuzhou University and East China University of Science and Technology, China, and an Associate Professor at Central Queensland University, Australia. He also held a Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester, UK, and the University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. His current work focuses on networked control and state estimation, distributed control and optimisation, health monitoring and fault detection, and signal processing for renewable energy integration, for example, renewable energy based microgrid and virtual power plant with renewable energy sources, battery energy storage and EV charging stations.

He was a recipient of the Teaching Excellence Award for Young Teachers in 1995 from Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China; five Science and Technology Development Awards in 1996, 1999, 2002, 2006 and 2010. Since 2001, he has been acting as a State Consultant receiving Special Allowance from the State Council of the People’s Republic of China.
Prof. Junwei Lu
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Prof. Junwei Lu (IEEE Senior Member and ICS Board Member) received the degree in electrical engineering from Xian Jiaotong University, China, and the M.Eng. degree in electronic and computer engineering from the National Toyama University, Japan, the Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the National Kanazawa University, Japan, in 1991.

From 1976 to 1984, he worked as a high voltage engineer with the electrical power industry (now is called State Grid) in China, where he was involved in the various national research projects for electrical power industry. From 1985, his academic research was in the area of applied computational electromagnetics at the laboratory of electrical communication engineering at Toyama University, Japan. He was involved in the development of magnetic devices with the Laboratory of Electrical Energy Conversion, Kanazawa University from 1988. He joined the School of Microelectronic Engineering, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia, in 1992, and moved to Gold Coast campus to establish the Electrical and Electronic Engineering as a Foundation Professor since 2011. . He has published over 300 journal and conference papers and three coauthored books in the area of EMC, harmonics balance finite element method and V2G, and holds over 10 international patents related smart antennas for mobile communications, high frequency transformers for DC/DC converters, and V2G on board EV charging system.

His fields of research interests are computational electromagnetics, EMC computer modeling and simulation, high-frequency (HF) magnetics for power electronics and renewable energy system. His current research interests include smart transformer and V2G with built-in statcom inverter and APF, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) for UAV and AGV, HF rotary transformer for brushless and PMless synchronous generator and DFIG in wind turbine and EV motor, hybrid AC/DC Microgrid, and Microgrid based fast EV charging systems.

No registered papers yet
SPECIAL SESSION: Lean and Green Thinking towards a transformed manufacturing sector
Session resume:

With the increasing trends of global waste generation and environmental pollution, there are many conversations internationally around how manufacturers can become more resource efficient and reduce waste. Lean thinking is described as business approach that aims to deliver better value for customers by eliminating non-value-adding activities. Within this realm, conventional ‘lean thinking’ has expanded into ‘lean and green thinking’ as a targeted intervention for manufacturers to reduce waste and pollution, comprising an integrated approach that focusses on resource optimisation and promotes strategies to ‘do more with less’.

Conferences and forums within this sector have increasingly focused on has never been a more exciting time to consider how ‘lean and green thinking’ as a targeted intervention for organizations to implement sustainable business models that reduce waste and improve material efficiency, and subsequently minimise costs. This is accomplished through opportunities to embed lean and green practices in work streams including waste, energy, emissions, water and chemical management.

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Prof. Les Dawes
Queensland University of Technology
Brisbane, Australia
Professor Dawes is Discipline Leader for Environmental Systems and Editor in Chief for the Australasian Journal of Engineering Education. His research has focussed on developing a better understanding of natural systems, both land and water related. His research is application based and grounded in finding solutions to complex environmental problems.
Dr. Savindi Caldera
Griffith University
Nathan, Australia
Dr Savindi Caldera holds a PhD in Environmental Engineering (2018) from Queensland University of Technology where she explored the co-evolution of lean and green thinking to achieve sustainable business practice. Savindi has been working with colleagues over the last 5 years to build capacity for lean and green thinking, resource efficiency and sustainable business practice, to foster a resilient natural and built environment. Her research focuses on developing pragmatic approaches to increase businesses' contribution towards sustainable development. She has industrial experience as a sustainability specialist in the manufacturing industry in Australia and overseas.

Invited papers (4)
SPECIAL SESSION: Harnessing the resource potential of our seas in a sustainable manner
Session resume:

The sea represents a huge resource for renewable energy (Blue Energy - BE). BE is the energy which can be harnessed from the ocean or the marine wind and it is comprised of five main types according to the origin of the extracted power, namely marine (offshore) wind, surface waves, tides/currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. Although the growth of offshore renewable energy technologies has so far been relatively slow compared to those onshore, it is anticipated that in the future BE will substantially contribute to the energy demands of coastal and insular areas, at the same time protecting and conserving the marine environment.

The Blue Growth Strategy proposed by the Commission in 2014 emphasized that harnessing the economic potential of BE in a sustainable manner represents a key policy area for the EU, which requires the involvement of the widest possible range of stakeholders in order to optimize capacity building and to achieve the necessary critical mass. The BE sector was, in fact, indicated as one of five developing areas in the ‘blue economy’ that could drive the creation high-quality jobs and pave the way for a new breed of science-trained professionals, enhancing eco-efficient value creation all along the value and supply chain. Moreover, exploiting this indigenous resource would help reduce the EU dependence on fossil fuels for electricity generation, and enhance energy security. In particular, islands and remote coastal regions can especially benefit from BE development, as it would provide a viable alternative to expensive and heavily polluting fossil fuelled plants, and contribute to their energy self-sufficiency.

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Dr. Hrvoje Mikulčić
Xi'an Jiaotong University
Xi'an, Shaanxi, China
HRVOJE MIKULČIĆ defended his PhD thesis in 2015 and works as a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Power Engineering, Energy and Environment, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb. His main research area include numerical modelling of fluid flow, solid fuel combustion, endothermic calcination reaction, radiation modelling, pollutant formation, greenhouse gasses emissions analysis and accounting, and energy efficiency improvements in industry. Since 2009 he has been working on the research project “Numerical modelling of multiphase flow and combustion processes” financed by the Austrian Institute for internal combustion engines AVL List GmbH. He has also been working on the national scientific project: Smart energy storage for sustainable development of energy systems, financed by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sport of the Republic of Croatia. From 2016 he is a project manager of a European INTERREG MED project PELAGOS - Promoting innovative networks and clusters for marine renewable energy synergies in Mediterranean coasts and islands, responsible for the Croatian part of the project. He is an author of 43 scientific papers, of which 29 in scientific journals (SCI). His current Scopus h-index is 12. From 2014 he serves as a SDEWES Special Issue Guest Editor in the Journal of Cleaner Production (IF 2016 =5.715), Journal of Environmental Management (IF 2016 =4.010), and Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy journal (IF 2016 =3.331).

Invited papers (1)
SPECIAL SESSION: Low carbon emission and air pollution prevention developments in power and energy intensive industries
Session resume:

Solid fuels like coal, biomass, and waste-derived fuels remain an important source for heating and electricity generation worldwide. Coal accounts for approximately 65% of the electricity production in China and likely will remain an important source of energy in the following years as well. For the European Union, consumption of coal is continuously decreasing and in 2017 for the first time, renewables production of electricity surpassed coal. Biomass consumption, as a renewable source, is expected to increase more significantly in the future, due to its carbon neutrality, while incineration of waste for energy generation will have an important role as an integrative part of waste management schemes. Thermal power plants are the biggest contributor to the greenhouse gas emissions like CO2, and even more, they are a significant source of NOX, SOX, and particulate matter (PM) emissions. China is one of the regions with the highest PM2.5 concentration in the world. More than 80% of people lived in the region where air quality did not reach the air quality standard in 2010, while premature mortality caused by PM is around 1.3 million in China. The European Economic Area estimates of the health impacts attributable to exposure to air pollution indicate that particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) concentrations in 2014 were responsible for about 399 000 premature deaths originating from long-term exposure in the EU-28. As can be seen, air pollution is not an only environmental problem but has a direct impact on human health. In 2013, after haze episodes, China for the first time introduced a stringent air pollution control with the main scope of reducing the PM2.5 concentrations, as well as the other pollutants like SOX and NOX. The European Union introduced EU Clean Air policy which marked PM, nitrogen and sulphur oxides, and dangerous heavy metals as the main concern for human health. Nevertheless, in 2018 it was shown that almost two-thirds of Member States are failing to comply with the EU air quality limit values. Pollutant emission can be slightly decreased by better fuel preparation, but even more by the deployment of Best Available Techniques (BAT), including end-of-pipe treatment of flue gases. 

This Special Session welcomes both fundamental and applied research papers, from industry and academia, that aim to experimentally and numerically investigate the applicability, operating conditions, and the techno-economic assessment of novel technologies in power and energy intensive industries.

Prof. Houzhang Tan
Xi'an Jiaotong University
Xi'an, China
Prof. Xuebin Wang
Xi'an Jiaotong University
Xi'an, China
Dr. Hrvoje Mikulčić
Xi'an Jiaotong University
Xi'an, Shaanxi, China
HRVOJE MIKULČIĆ defended his PhD thesis in 2015 and works as a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Power Engineering, Energy and Environment, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, University of Zagreb. His main research area include numerical modelling of fluid flow, solid fuel combustion, endothermic calcination reaction, radiation modelling, pollutant formation, greenhouse gasses emissions analysis and accounting, and energy efficiency improvements in industry. Since 2009 he has been working on the research project “Numerical modelling of multiphase flow and combustion processes” financed by the Austrian Institute for internal combustion engines AVL List GmbH. He has also been working on the national scientific project: Smart energy storage for sustainable development of energy systems, financed by the Ministry of Science, Education and Sport of the Republic of Croatia. From 2016 he is a project manager of a European INTERREG MED project PELAGOS - Promoting innovative networks and clusters for marine renewable energy synergies in Mediterranean coasts and islands, responsible for the Croatian part of the project. He is an author of 43 scientific papers, of which 29 in scientific journals (SCI). His current Scopus h-index is 12. From 2014 he serves as a SDEWES Special Issue Guest Editor in the Journal of Cleaner Production (IF 2016 =5.715), Journal of Environmental Management (IF 2016 =4.010), and Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy journal (IF 2016 =3.331).

Invited papers (25)
SPECIAL SESSION: Hydrogen energy technologies in the Asia Pacific region – Challenges and solutions
Session resume:

Hydrogen energy technologies are rapidly advancing through significant research and development effort and investment. Much of the recent interest in hydrogen energy technologies is due to the decreased cost of renewable electricity generation and potential to use hydrogen as a grid-scale energy storage chemical. Indeed, several countries are acting on the opportunity to become renewable energy exporters through the export of hydrogen. However, care should be taken to ensure the deployment of hydrogen energy technologies enables and supports sustainable development of energy, water and environmental systems.

Hydrogen energy technologies are extremely flexible and could influence everything from displacement of fossil fuels in the energy network, providing grid-scale renewable energy storage, and enable remote locations to have greater energy security through self-sufficiency. In order to realise this potential, the unique problems of each location and situation need to be fully understood so solutions can be tailored to each situation.

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Dr. Krystina Lamb
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Dr Krystina Lamb is a hydrogen energy researcher who works in multi-disciplinary teams to conduct fundamental and applied materials research for a sustainable future. Krystina current work is supported by a grant from Griffith University and focuses on materials for making hydrogen compression safer by developing materials that are air-stable. Krystina and Evan are also working with CSIRO on a project to demonstrate a solid state hydrogen compressor. Krystina’s areas of interest include physical hydrogen compression and storage, chemical storage of hydrogen in ammonia including ammonia synthesis and decomposition, proton exchange membrane and fuel cell technology, and social responsibility and economics of hydrogen energy technologies. Krystina has won awards for her science-themed short stories and in an invited expert writer for hydrogen technology magazines and websites.
Prof. Evan Gray
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Evan Gray is a Professor of Physics at Griffith University. His basic research focusses on energy-related materials, especially hydrogen storage materials and hydrogen embrittlement of high-strength alloys such as pipeline steels. Evan’s applied research encompasses hydrogen microgrids, hydrogen storage for off-grid electricity supply, metal-hydride compressors for hydrogen filling stations and computer modelling of all aspects of renewable energy systems from the device to the enterprise level. He is closely associated with the Sir Samuel Griffith Centre, a solar-powered building which demonstrates hydrogen energy technology and includes massive hydrogen storage in the form of a metal hydride. Evan is Deputy Leader of Research Program 3: Offshore Renewable Energy Systems in the Blue Economy CRC. He also sits on the Steering Committee of the CSIRO working group that will shortly report on National Hydrogen Research, Development and Demonstration (RD&D) Priorities & Opportunities.

No registered papers yet
SPECIAL SESSION: Smart urban mobility in the era of automation and connectivity, electrification and personalisation
Session resume:

Our urban mobility systems are undergoing revolutionary changes, mainly triggered by the development of vehicle technologies and system-level demand management. Indeed, on the one hand, connected and automated cars, electric vehicles, and even flying vehicles have made decisive progress in the past decade. On the other hand, the transport operations and demand management are also experiencing a paradigm shift to service-oriented, including carsharing, ridesharing, and on-demand services. In this era, we need to focus more on the integration of these emerging technologies and better prepare for the next generation of transport systems as a whole.

This special session is focused on topics with regard to the smart urban mobility systems in the era of connected and automated transport systems, transport electrification and personalized transport services modes. Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Integrating vehicle technologies and mobility services
  • Policies to promote emerging transport solutions
  • Mobility as a service (MaaS)
  • New findings and thoughts for directions of smart mobility systems
  • Hidden challenges in the era of connected, automated, and electric transport systems
  • Smart urban transit planning and modelling
  • Lessons from fields experiments of connected and automated vehicles
  • Applications of emerging vehicle technologies in transportation systems
  • Ideas and paradigms of new mobility services
  • Mobility data analytics
  • Field experiments and real-world deployment of emerging vehicle technologies
  • Impacts of emerging technologies and services on transportation system safety, efficiency, energy consumption and environmental footprints
Prof. Xiaobo Qu
Chalmers University of Technology
Chalmers, Sweden

Invited papers (8)
SPECIAL SESSION: Mainstreaming circular economy and the renewable energy transition
Session resume:

The renewable energy transition is gathering pace globally, including in the Asia Pacific. In parallel, companies and governments are promoting design for a circular economy with systems to cycle materials – in products and infrastructure – which lasts longer and then can be easily reused, remanufactured or recycled. Whilst there is a clear need to connect the narratives and aims of the circular economy and renewable energy tranisiton, progress remains insufficient. Studies on the material-energy nexus often promote a ‘panacea of integration’ without deeper exploration of the barriers and tradeoffs and take a techno-centric view. Whilst connecting to renewables is part of many circular economy strategies, circular economy principles are far from being mainstream in the renewable energy transition.


This special session will explore how to better connect the adoption of circular economy principles and practices with the momentum of the renewable energy transition. It encourages contributions from across scales from local to national to the Asia-Pacific region, from across disciplines including from engineering, business, social and policital sciences, with both academic and industry or policymaker contributions welcome.

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Prof. Damien Giurco
University of Technology Sydney
Broadway, Australia
Damien Giurco is Professor of Resource Futures and Director (Innovation) at the Institute for Sustainable Futures, University of Technology Sydney. His work with government and industry focuses on resource stewardship and he directs the Wealth from Waste Cluster, a collaborative research program supporting circular economy pathways and policies for metals. He is Editor-in-Chief for the journal Resources.

Invited papers (1)
SPECIAL SESSION: Planning for Sustainable Urban Water Management in a Changing Climate
Session resume:

Water is essential for all sectors of society, across all scales: from regions to cities, and from whole industries to individual households. Sustainable development requires water systems that manage supply and demand in a way that ensures sufficient quantity and acceptable quality in the long term. This task is made more challenging by the pressures of increasing population, growing per capita demand, infrastructure limitations, rising water scarcity, and the impacts of climate change. Planning for a sustainable and resilient urban water system should therefore be one of the key policy priorities for governments at all levels.

This Special Session is seeking papers that offer insights into how governments can use their policy and planning capacities to help make the transition to more sustainable and climate change resilient urban water systems. Proposals for the most effective, efficient and appropriate policy/planning responses are encouraged. Papers could deal with both supply and/or demand management and consider best practice across the sector. Approaches that use analytical tools such as life-cycle analysis, ecological footprints, and/or the triple bottom-line of sustainability are also welcome. The key focus of all papers should be on improving the interaction between government, business and the community in order to deliver better outcomes.

Prof. Michael Howes
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Associate Professor Michael Howes is the Head of the Environmental Planning and Management discipline within the School of Environment and Science at Griffith University. He is also an Adaptation Science researcher with the Cities Research Institute, and Program Director for the Master of Environment. His work explores how governments try to make society more sustainable and resilient, with specific projects on climate change, sustainable development, water management, environment protection, public environmental reporting, and ecological modernisation. Michael has authored more than 70 international academic publications, including a book, and in addition has produced numerous professional reports. He has won 17 research grants and supervised 21 PhD students. Before becoming an academic Michael worked for several years as an industrial chemist and technical manager in the manufacturing sector. He has also been a member of the Queensland Conservation Council board and chaired a Technical Advisory Panel for the Australian Government’s National Pollutant Inventory.

No registered papers yet
SPECIAL SESSION: Decision support systems for increasing climate resilience of infrastructure systems
Session resume:

Increased frequency and intensity of extreme events due to climate change are likely to affect infrastructure. By 2040, the global population will grow by almost 2 billion people – a 25% increase. Rural to urban migration will continue with the urban population growing by 46%, triggering massive stress on existing aging infrastructure and demand for new infrastructure. This makes our cities more vulnerable. On top of that, there is a significant concentration of critical infrastructure in coastal and other areas naturally vulnerable to major disasters. The potential for widespread impacts of disasters has never been greater in society than today, and as climate change accelerates in the future, the risks are only likely to grow.

Our infrastructure systems are becoming increasingly interconnected and interdependent. A disruption in one infrastructure can cascade into multiple infrastructures, with massive risks to economies, businesses and society in general. Therefore, it is important to investigate innovative ways to increase the resilience of our interconnected and interdependent infrastructure systems, and identify data, methods and tools that can help build adaptive capacity to present-day and future climate change.

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Dr. Fahim N Tonmoy
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Fahim Tonmoy is a Senior Engineer in a large multi-national consulting firm BMT. He is also an Adjunct Research Fellow at Griffith University, Australia and an Adjunct Lecturer at the School of Civil Engineering under University of Sydney, Australia. With a PhD in Civil Engineering from the University of Sydney, Fahim is specialised in engineering resilience, climate change adaptation planning, risk/vulnerability assessments and development of risk management decision support tools. Over the last 14 years he has worked extensively in academia as well as in engineering industry in multiple countries. Fahim works in the interface of engineering, science and policy and develop insights, tools and data products to support policy makers in managing climatic and natural disaster risks of infrastructure systems. Fahim is specialised in data analysis and modelling (sea level rise, urban heat island, catastrophe modelling) and their impacts on critical infrastructure. His works attempt to help state and local governments, large infrastructure operators, businesses and coastal communities in better managing climate change and disaster risks though building their resilience.
Fahim is recipient of research awards (NSW coastal management award, 2014; Australian coastal council research award 2017) and was invited as visiting scholar in international research organisations (University of Central Florida, USA; Global Climate Forum, Germany). He is one of the main contributors of Australia's national climate change adaptation tool CoastAdapt and Queensland State Government's State-wide climate change sector adaptation plans (Emergency Management Sector and Health Infrastructure Sector). Fahim is also a contributing author of upcoming European Union’s Science for Disaster Risk Management 2020 report.

No registered papers yet
SPECIAL SESSION: SeaCities: creating synergies at the urban interface between sea and cities
Session resume:

About 37% of the global population lives in coastal communities and cities by the sea, with 9 out of 10 of the world's largest cities exposed to the impacts of rising sea levels by 2050. Detrimental anthropogenic effects on settlements in coastal zones include loss of land, storm surge intensification, deterioration of urban and natural environments, infrastructure vulnerabilities, human health risks, food insecurity and, as a consequence, an increasingly volatile economy.

Current research and decision-making focuses on defining and managing the increasing risks for coastal communities rather than exploring and developing novel design, engineering and infrastructure solutions. As a consequence, the focus of this session is to explore novel approaches to tackling urban vulnerability in coastal cities resulting from climate change, thereby helping to relieve land-based population and development pressures and create sustainable and resilient “SeaCities”. Specifically, this session is seeking papers that focus on:

  1. Holistic and interdisciplinary research approaches to enable the shift from coastal protection strategies to coastal accommodation/release strategies, thereby combining traditional research methods on risks and vulnerabilities with adaptable design approaches;
  2. Research opportunities for urban extensions to existing cities, including marine estates, sea-related industries, maritime transport, oceanic tourist attractions, and the development of additional coastal ecological zones;
  3. Developing innovative approaches to building with nature, thereby creating ecosystem-based developments on land and sea.
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Prof. Joerg Baumeister
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Prof Dr.-Ing. Joerg Baumeister has been a practitioner, educator, researcher and consultant for Architecture and Urban Design for more than 20 years throughout Europe, Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Asia, and Australia.
Joerg is an award-winning Architect and Urban Designer. He continues to be an enthusiastic keynote speaker at international conferences and University educator with passion for "his" students. Joerg also has extensive experience on an executive University level as Research Centre Director, Chair, and Department Head.
As researcher he has expertise in discovering new research topics and leading consequential research projects by attracting millions of dollars in grants. Several research projects have been applied and published in books and government reports.
Joerg is also consulting with governmental institutions strategically on the federal, state and regional level as well as NGOs and private industry leaders. Thereby his aim is to apply his current research interests which comprises ecological cities, affordable housing in serial building technology, and future innovation through creative thinking.
A new focus area lies in leading the evolution of the Cities Research Institute's "SeaCities" research group and the development and execution of government and industry research projects related to that. The aim is to create innovative design solutions for future water-adapted architecture and cities.
Dr. Edoardo Bertone
Griffith University
Gold Coast (Queensland), Australia
Dr. Edoardo Bertone is a lecturer at the School of Engineering & Built Environment and Cities Research Institute, Griffith University. He holds a Bachelor and Master degrees in Civil Engineering from the Polytechnic University of Turin (Italy) and a PhD in Water Resources Engineering from Griffith. He has a current research focus on data-driven modelling, Bayesian Network and System Dynamics modelling applied to the water resources management (e.g. water treatment optimisation and cost reduction), water-energy nexus, environmental health and climate change adaptation fields. Since the completion of his PhD in 2015, he has worked in research projects involving all the main Australian water utilities, as well as a number of city councils, government organisations and private companies. He has contributed to securing over 1 million dollars in research funding, and he is now an active researcher of the SeaCities research group.

Invited papers (1)
SPECIAL SESSION: Water-energy systems in off-grid remote, island and Indigenous communities
Session resume:

There are many challenges associated with maintaining safe drinking water and reliable energy systems. In particular, delivering safely managed drinking water and ensuring reliable energy supplies presents unique and site specific challenges for remote, isolated and island communities. Looking through a wider lens beyond just managing these essential services of water and energy in an engineering context, there is a increasingly urgent need to investigate further into the complex interactions between community, service provider, technology, culture, governance and environment in remote and isolated communities (including islands and Indigenous communities). Moreover, as we seek to meet the SDG goals for water and energy, we can no longer rely on "business as usual" management approaches, but need to look toward a systems approach accounting for the inherent inter-dependencies in water and energy resource management in remote and isolated communities.

This Special Session is seeking papers that demonstrate research into either water and/or energy systems in non-urban contexts – this may be remote, isolated, island, regional communities and may include Indigenous populations. The work should address not only the challenges associated with water and/or energy management in such commutnies but offer some solutions to addressing these challenges. Work that has focussed on community-based, systems approaches will be well received. Both qualitative and quantitative research approaches are welcome with an emphasis on examples of trials or pilots that demonstrate successful, fit-for-purpose, technically and/or culturally appropriate options for sustaibaly delivery or management of water/energy systems. Research on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) solutions in small communities is also encourgared.

Dr. Cara Beal
Griffith University
Southport / Nathan, Australia
Dr Cara Beal is a Senior Research Fellow at the Cities Research Institute and the School of Engineering, and Senior Lecturer of Environmental Health at the School of Medicine, Griffith University. Dr Beal has active research interests in the field of environmental science, environmental health, water resource management and environmental engineering. Dr Beal is currently managing industry collaborative research projects employing mixed method approaches which integrate community-led qualitative research with 'big data' metering and monitoring technologies. Most recently, Cara has been employing a combination of qualitative and quantitative research to capture a holistic approach toward transitioning water and energy service provision into an efficient and community-supported sustainable practice. Dr Beal has published over 90 peer-reviewed journal and conference papers and is passionate about linking her research with industry and community. Cara also teaches into the Environmental Health major in the School of Medicine and water, sanitation and hygiene subjects at the International WaterCentre. Dr Beal has high research impact and industry peer recognition having published over 100 journal, conference and major report outputs (1700+ citations, H-index 22, Scopus index 16) and is a recipient of several industry and academic awards. Since 2010, Dr Beal has attracted over $3M of external funds and has managed projects exceeding $4M.

Invited papers (7)
SPECIAL SESSION: Water and energy conservation in the tourism industry
Session resume:

The tourism sector has the potential to contribute to the UN Sustainable Development Goals. At present, however, tourism is a resource intense industry contributing significantly to global greenhouse gas emissions and adding pressure on scare natural resources such as water. Tourism’s strong growth predictions have led to concerns about the sustainability of the sector and whether positive outcomes outweigh environmental costs. With increasing consumer awareness of sustainability issues and increasing cost associated with resources, it is in the sector’s interest to use resources more efficiently. This special session provides an opportunity to discuss new insights in the field of energy and water conservation in tourism. Both academic and applied knowledge is welcome. Papers may focus on operational as well as strategic aspects at global, destination or business levels. Themes may include the development and application of new technologies in tourism, sustainable resources management strategies, potential for behaviour change, low-carbon strategies, and policy responses. New research approaches such as systems thinking or innovative methods are welcome. 

Prof. Susanne Becken
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Prof Susanne Becken is a Professor of Sustainable Tourism at Griffith University in Australia and the Principal Science Investment Advisor for tourism in the Department of Conservation, New Zealand. She is also a Vice Chancellor Research Fellow at the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom and was the founding Director of the Griffith Institute for Tourism. She has published over 100 articles on sustainable tourism, climate change and tourism resource use. Susanne is a member of the Air New Zealand Sustainability Advisory Panel, the NOW Transforming Travel Advisory Board, and an invited expert on the Whitsunday Climate Change Innovation Hub. Susanne is a Fellow of the International Academy of the Study of Tourism.
Mr. Stewart Moore
EarthCheck
Brisbane, Australia
Stewart Moore is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of EarthCheck and the Executive Director of the APEC International Centre for Sustainable Tourism. EarthCheck is a Brisbane based environmental management and advisory company which specializes in sustainable tourism. EarthCheck now operates in over 70 countries across 32 industry sectors in six languages.
Stewart is a fellow of the Financial Services Institute of Australia and the Australian Tourism Research Institute and has over 30 years of experience in tourism operations and consulting to both the private and public sector in the Asia Pacific region.
In 2013 Stewart was named in the Global list of the top 50 sustainability professionals (ABC Carbon Singapore). He served on the Tourism Forecasting Council of Australia for ten years and was Chairman of the Pacific Asia Travel Association in Queensland for eight years. He is on the Advisory Board for the Griffith University Institute for Tourism and is Deputy Chairman of the PATA Foundation and Chairman of the National Centre for Studies in Travel and Tourism.
Stewart has a Masters of Regional Science specialising in tourism planning and sustainable development, a Bachelor of Regional and Town Planning (Honours) and has completed post graduate studies in Finance and Investment from the Financial and Services Institute of Australia (FINSIA); Conservation and Heritage from the Institute of Advanced Architectural Studies, University of York, U.K.
Stewart has co-authored a wide range of books and publications in the areas of destination management, risk and crisis management, strategic and regional planning and product development.
Ms. Johanna Loehr
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Johanna Loehr is a Doctoral candidate at the Griffith Institute for Tourism, as well as an active sustainable tourism industry professional at EarthCheck. She has completed projects for both government and the private sector and is a Master Trainer at the EarthCheck Training Academy. She holds a Bachelor in Environmental Tourism Management from Southern Cross University, Australia, and a Master of Science in Sustainable Tourism Planning from Bournemouth University, UK, for which she was awarded the West Beach prize for best Master of Tourism Student. Her research interests are tourism and climate change, sustainable tourism, policy making and systems thinking. Her PhD focuses on destination wide climate change risk reduction in the South Pacific.

Invited papers (1)
SPECIAL SESSION: Integrations of Renewable energy, battery energy storage systems and electric vehicles in Smart Grids-Technical, Economic and Social Challenges
Session resume:

The integration level of renewable generators has increased significantly in recent years which brings several opportunities and challenges for the grid operators. The increasing penetration of clean and renewable energy will bring with its major shifts in the behavior of power grids. Distributed generation and storage capabilities are necessary to meet environmental targets, to accommodate the increasing emphasis on demand responses. The batteries in electric vehicle can be used as storage as the daily travel only use a small percent of its overall capacity.  The numbers of electric vehicles (EVs) are growing rapidly throughout the world and, accordingly, they have drawn lots of attention because of their various potential functions on the grid. However, there are number of key technical and economic issues that need to be addressed before large-scale integrations of distributed energy resources in low-voltage distribution networks. Important key technical issues are energy efficiency, energy management, power quality, voltage stability and coordinated control of distributed generators. There are also several economic, social and regulatory issues that need to be addressed for the safe, reliable and affordable power supply in future smart grids with distributed energy resources.

 Technical papers are invited from researchers, practicing engineers and students on any subject related to the scope of the special sessions that includes, but is not limited to the following major topics:

Dr. Jahangir Hossain
Macquarie University
Sydney, Australia
Dr. Jahangir Hossain received B.Sc. and M.Sc. Eng. degrees from Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology (RUET), Bangladesh, in 2001 and 2005, respectively, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of New South Wales, Australia in December 2010, all in electrical and electronic engineering.

He is currently working as lecturer in the discipline of Electrical and Electronic Engineering under the Griffith School of Engineering. Before joining at Griffith University, he served as a research fellow in the School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, Australia. Previously, he worked as a lecturer and assistant professor at RUET for six years. He has published more than 100 articles in international refereed journals and conferences. He is a senior member of IEEE.
His research interests are: (i) renewable energy integration and microgrids, (ii) distributed generations, and (iii) stability analysis and control.

No registered papers yet
SPECIAL SESSION: Engineering a Sustainable Circular Economy: Materials, Energy and Infrastructure Integration for Smart Cities and Industry
Session resume:

Circular Economy has emerged as a popular research topic that is shaping public policy in Europe, China, America and elsewhere. It has been the subject of more than 1,500 research papers in the past two years. Conceptually, Circular Economy is not complicated. It includes recycling, recovering, and reusing material and energy flows will make a system more circular, thereby reducing raw material inputs and waste outputs. Important criticisms of Circular Economy, however, point out that it lacks consideration for sustainability in Circular Economy business model, respect for physical law (thermodynamics), and robust engineering methods to design a Circular Economy. These current shortfalls make it necessary to develop the Circular Economy framework further, accounting for the fact that the Sustainable Development needs to form a central goal, while engineering analysis and design can provide the toolset for achieving that goal. The concept of Circular Integration, as an engineering-based framework, was proposed to address these issues and to support collective progress towards a Sustainable Circular Economy. All macro-systems contain inherent trade-offs between material and energy flows, which influence the design and performance of the system. Understanding and optimising these trade-offs are critical to maximising the sustainability of a system.

The session invites contributions that aim to support the development of a Sustainable Circular Economy. Papers that look at the roles of and trade-offs between materials, energy, and infrastructure in the context of a Sustainable Circular Economy are most welcome. As a fundamental engineering principle, the integration of processes, sites and regions provides a technical description for the recycling, recovering, and reusing material and energy flows that applies to multi-scales, and will be highlighted as part of this session. Moving towards a Sustainable Circular Economy also entails essential reductions in greenhouse gas, NOx, SOx, and particulate emissions, improvements in water and land management, optimisation of footprints, and better utilisation of infrastructure. The goal of the session is to provide a platform for exchanging ideas and knowledge, stimulating discussion, and fostering international collaboration on the subject of Sustainable Circular Economy.

Dr. Timothy Walmsley
University of Waikato
Hamilton, New Zealand
Prof. Jiří Jaromír Klemeš
Brno University of Technology - VUT Brno
Brno, Czech Republic
Head of “Sustainable Process Integration Laboratory – SPIL”, NETME Centre, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology - VUT Brno, Czech Republic and Emeritus Professor at “Centre for Process Systems Engineering and Sustainability”, Pázmány Péter Catholic University, Budapest, Hungary.
Previously the Project Director, Senior Project Officer and Hon Reader at Department of Process Integration at UMIST, The University of Manchester and University of Edinburgh, UK. Founder and a long term Head of the Centre for Process Integration and Intensification – CPI2, University of Pannonia, Veszprém, Hungary. Awarded by the EC with Marie Curies Chair of Excellence (EXC). Track record of managing and coordinating 91 major EC, NATO and UK Know-How projects. Research funding attracted over 21 M€.
Co-Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Cleaner Production. The founder and President for 20 y of PRES (Process Integration for Energy Saving and Pollution Reduction) conferences. Chairperson of CAPE Working Party of EFCE, a member of WP on Process Intensification and of the EFCE Sustainability platform. He authored and co-authored nearly 400 papers, h-index reaching 42. A number of books published by Elsevier, Woodhead, McGraw-Hill; Ashgate Publishing Cambridge; Springer; WILEY-VCH; Taylor & Francis).
Several times Distinguished Visiting Professor at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia and University Technology Petronas, Malayisa; Xi’an Jiaotong University; South China University of Technology, Guangzhou and Tianjin University in China; University of Maribor, Slovenia; Brno University of Technology and the Russian Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Moscow. Doctor Honoris Causa of Kharkiv National University “Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute” in Ukraine, the University of Maribor in Slovenia, University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, Romania. “Honorary Doctor of Engineering Universiti Teknologi Malaysia”. Awarded with “Honorary Membership of Czech Society of Chemical Engineering", "European Federation of Chemical Engineering (EFCE) Life-Time Achievements Award" and "Pro Universitaire Pannonica" Gold Medal.
Dr. Petar Sabev Varbanov
Sustainable Process Integration Laboratory – SPIL, NETME Centre, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology - VUT Brno
Brno, Czech Republic
is a Senior Researcher at the Sustainable Process Integration Laboratiry – NETME Centre, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology and at the Centre for Process Systems Engineering & Sustainability, Székesfehérvár – at the Pázmány Péter Catholic University (Budapest), Hungary. He obtained his PhD in Process Integration at a prestigious British University – UMIST, Manchester, with distinction. For performing research on minimising and mitigating Climate Change he was awarded a scholarship from the UK Tyndall Centre. Later he was awarded a prestigious Marie Curie EIF Fellowship and successfully performed research on Optimising the Start-up of Distillation Columns at the Technische Universität Berlin. This was followed by a Marie Curie ERG Fellowship for assisting his integration into the University of Pannonia – Hungary, where he is a Deputy Head of the Centre for Process Integration and Intensification CPI2. His experience covers energy saving, optimisation of energy supply networks, Process Synthesis and Process Operation. His research has been successfully implemented in collaboration with industrial partners: e.g. BP (UK) and MOL (Hungary). He has been contributing to 25 research and consultancy projects (most within the EC funding schemes) and has published more than 70 papers in peer-reviewed journals. He is a co-author of two books and several chapters in books.
He has been the Editor for “Energy – The International Journal” published by Elsevier.
Prof. Kim L Pickering
University of Waikato
Waikato, New Zealand
Prof. Pickering is the Associate Dean (Research) for the Division of Health, Engineering, Computing and Science and leads the Polymers and Composites Research Group in the Engineering School, as well as directs the Waikato Centre of Advanced Materials and Manufacturing (WaiCAMM) at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. With a degree in Materials from Imperial College, London and a PhD in Composites from Surrey University, United Kingdom, she has focussed on improved sustainability of engineering materials including natural fibre composites. She is a Fellow of the Institute of Professional Engineers of New Zealand and has been awarded the R J Scott Medal by the Royal Society of New Zealand. She has written more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, 6 patents, and has more than 5000 citations and an H-index of 37.

Invited papers (23)
SPECIAL SESSION: Role of Intelligent Sensor Networks and Big Data Informatics for Enhanced Management of Urban Water and Energy Resources
Session resume:

Traditional delivery of urban water and energy resources has been a conservative process whereby utilities offered a relatively unsophisticated service to their customers. As expectations to provide a leaner, greaner and customer-focussed utility rise, it has become clear that conventional means of water and energy provision are no longer adequate in the era of the digital information age. As the momentum gathers, there is growing pressure on the utility sector to transition to the digital age.

Developing technologies and the accompanying big data informatics, once fully understood and exploited, are the truly “smart” components of a digital water, electricity or gas grid, and these informatics can be used for a range of applications. Informatics applying statistical, mathematical, machine learning and rule-based approaches can be used to provide important information on demand from the available data provided at second, minute or hourly intervals. Such information is powerful for government, utility and customer planning and decision making. Moreover, acknowledgement of water-energy links is emerging as a key pathway for integration of water and energy multi-utility services provision.  

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Prof. Rodney Stewart
Griffith University
Gold Coast City, Australia
Rodney Stewart is a Professor and Deputy Head of School (Research) in the School of Engineering and Built Environment based at Griffith University, Gold Coast City, Queensland Australia. Professor Stewart is an expert in engineering, construction and environmental engineering and management research. His current particular area of research focus is on digital utility transformation. Professor Stewart is leading industry collaborative research projects that seek to integrate 'big data' metering and monitoring technologies and associated expert systems into infrastructure, particularly in the water and energy utility sector, in order to better manage these critical resources and better integrate contemporary solutions such as renewable energy and decentralised water supply. He has a rapidly growing citation trajectory with a H-Index of 43, i-10 index of 100 and over 5600 citations (September 2019; Scholar). He has received over USD $5M of external funding, including over 15 years of continuous prestigious significant Australian Research Council (ARC) funding to date. He has averaged over 15 refereed publications per year in his academic career. Professor Stewart has research peer esteem being ARC assessor for grant applications, as well as organising committee or invited/keynote speaker for a number of international specialist conferences. Rodney has supervised to successful completion over twenty PhD/MPhil graduates to date; many of which have received national or international accolades for their research outputs and all employed after completion. He has numerous visiting Fellow (funded) invitations including for example, 2012 and 2017 visits to the strong Urban Water Systems Group in Exeter (UK), 2013 visit to UC-Davis Centre for Watershed Sciences (USA), and 2017 visit to Cambridge University.

Invited papers (8)
SPECIAL SESSION: Autotrophic Cities: from consuming to producing urbanism
Session resume:

Our world is approaching a battle between a rising population combined with an influx of urbanisation (increasing the demand on jobs, housing, transportation, energy, water and food) and the fatal consequences on our ecological system. Consequently, the current (linear) urban model continues to challenge the wealth and wellbeing of future generations. Based on consumption and resource throughput, not only are we depleting resources (e.g., energy, nutrients, water, space) but adding ever more amounts of waste and greenhouse gas emissions.

To ease the pressure on the natural environment, our ability to adapt our urban realities to the finite world we are living in, a transformation of today’s cities into ecologically sustainable cities will be necessary.

Hence this special session approaches a holistic system’s perspective to think beyond current urban metabolism and circular economy trends. Like autotrophic organisms can produce their own food (using light, water, carbon-dioxide, etc.), this session seeks to explore solutions to transform the heterotrophic (consuming) city into an autotrophic (producing) one. Autotrophy is used here as a concept for cities to become primary producers for the survival of humankind, where all resources, processes and structures are interlinked, interdependent and coevolving (creating long-term balance).

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Prof. Daniela A. Ottmann
Bond University
Gold Coast, Australia
Dr Ottmann is on a continuous exploration of understanding and innovating correlations between the built environment, people and nature. She has been practising architecture and urban design for over 15 years in various socio-cultural environments (Europe, Arabia, Africa), climate zones (desert, subtropical, temperate) and on various scales (urban design, architecture, interior design), besides questioning and re-defining applied practice through research and education at various universities in Germany, UAE, Oman, Australia and China.
Her research is dedicated to serve bio-climatic buildings and urban conglomerations through ecologically adapted strategies that foster healthy environments for people and integrate urbanisation to ecological system principles amongst socio-cultural aspects.
In her current position at the Abedian School of Architecture at Bond University, Daniela coordinates the environmental design stream although HDR, postgraduate and graduate education. As lead of TAED (Tectonic architecture and ecological Design) at the Centre for Comparative Construction Research her research projects reach from Eco-composite materials, NeuroCities, Co-Living Design (age-appropriate, inclusive, participatory design) to prefabrication solutions for affordable housing for the Australian government.
Dr Ottmann has authored amongst other publications ‘Urban Ecolution: Future solutions for healthy and ecologically integrated cities.’, ’Housing + modular housing system’, ‘C+ ‘My future home’, and ‘Urban Correlator: Strategies for an ecologically adaptable urban and architectural development’.

Invited papers (1)
SPECIAL SESSION: Life cycle assessment for achieving sustainable engineering solutions
Session resume:

The engineering context for sustainability involves the design and management of sustainable technology, research into environmental and social impacts and a good understanding of the limitations of carrying capacity and management of resources using a ‘cradle to cradle’ life cycle approach to achieve circular and green economy principles. Life cycle assessment (LCA) assists engineering innovation of products and processes (e.g. resource recovery, remanufacturing, multi-functional devices, energy storage system, digitization) during the product/service life cycle to help achieve closed loop material flow and to decouple emissions and energy and water use from economic growth. 

LCA is an approach that estimates the environmental, social and economic impacts of a product or service over its entire life cycle. Environmental Life Cycle Assessment (ELCA), Life Cycle Costing (LCC) and Social Life Cycle Assessment (SLCA) tools of LCA are not only used to assess the environmental, economic and social implications of goods and services but also to reduce a product’s resource use and environmental impact, improve its social and socio-economic performance throughout its life cycle, help redesign more efficient product supply chains and to avoid shifting problems from one stage of life cycle to another, from one geographic location to another.

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Prof. Wahidul Biswas
Curtin University
Perth, Australia
Dr Wahidul Biswas is an Associate Professor at the Sustainable Energy Group, Curtin University, Western Australia. Wahidul was trained as a Mechanical Engineer, researching the performance of diesel engines using biogas fuel. He has a Masters in Environmental Technology from Imperial College, London, and a PhD in Sustainable Futures from the University of Technology, Sydney. A/Prof Biswas teaches and coordinates postgraduate units on Life Cycle Management, Eco-Efficiency Strategies, Industrial Ecology, Environmental Systems, and Sustainable Energy and a core undergraduate Engineering unit, Engineering for Sustainable Development. He has so far carried out extensive life cycle assessment, industrial symbiosis and sustainability related research projects for the Australian agricultural, alternative fuels, building and construction, manufacturing, livestock, mining, gas and water sectors in collaboration with the Department of Climate Change, the Grains Research and Development Commission, Department of Agriculture and Food, University of Western Australia, Department of Primary Industries, Meat and Livestock Australia, Worley Parsons, Water Corporation, Alcoa World Alumina, Enterprise Connect, Recom Engineering, Cedar Woods, Earth Care, Department of State Development, Kwinana Industrial Council, Cockburn Cement and Waste Authority. A/Prof Biswas expanded his LCA research overseas as he completed the LCA of water treatment process and developed environmental product declaration (EPD) of building materials for Gulf Organization of Research and Development (GORD), Qatar. He is the recipient of USD545K competitive grant provided by Qatar National Research Fund to carry out a project entitled, “Techno-economic and environmental assessment of future water supply options for Qatar’s water supply”.
https://staffportal.curtin.edu.au/staff/profile/view/W.Biswas

Invited papers (5)
SPECIAL SESSION: Measuring and Modelling Sustainable Development & Sustainability
Session resume:

Sustainable development is multidimensional and dynamic. Undoubtedly, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agreed in the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development address many barriers to sustainable development. Particularly, these goals contain better coverage of the three primary dimensions of sustainable development: social, economic, and environmental across all countries regardless of their existing positions on the road to complete achievement of those goals. However, the SDGs spreading across 17 goals, 169 targets, and over 300 indicators provide diluted guidance at best (Costanza et al. 2016).

Measuring sustainable development is very crucial for policy design and implementation but is very challenging. Recent literature has discussed many limitations of existing literature on measuring sustainable development at both local, national and international levels (Hák, Janoušková, and Moldan 2016; Klopp and Petretta 2017; Frugoli et al. 2015).

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Dr. Viet-Ngu (Vincent) Hoang
Queensland University of Technology (QUT)
Queensland, Australia
As a Senior Applied Economist, Vincent conducts research on organisational performance, family and individual behaviors in a variety of context and sectors including sustainability, farming, education and health. Vincent has rich experience in conducting applied economic studies that ultimately help understand how people and organisations behave differently and how these lead to variations in their performance.
His interest particularly falls into the areas of sustainability and sustainable development. His publications in these areas focus on using a variety of methods to measure sustainability as well as progress to sustainable development goals.
Vincent is very enthusiastic about applying complex and advanced econometric modelling and operational research techniques to discover new knowledge to support better decision making.
Vincent has more than 50 publications, mainly in Q1 outlets over the last ten years. He is very active in nurturing young researchers. In his 10 years academic career, he has been supervising nearly 20 PhD students.
Vincent is currently a member of Centre for Behavioural Economics, Society and Technology (QUT) and Center for Efficiency and Productivity Analysis (UQ). Vincent is also a founding member of the Environmental and Public Policy Group at the School of Economics and Finance. He is also an expert in OECD’s Network of Experts in TFP and Environment.

Invited papers (9)
SPECIAL SESSION: Sustainable development and health
Session resume:

Health has been recognised as one of the United Nations sustainable development goals. Economic development, environment, and health possess inter-related and dynamic relationship. Achieving a triple bottom line of strong economic growth, clean environment and good health is the interest of researchers, policymakers and other stakeholders. However, the current relationship between economic development, environment and human health across the globe is far from harmony. Research plays a crucial role to improve our understanding and lead to action that ensure a harmonious relationship between economic development, natural environment and human health.

This special session invites research papers to provide empirical evidence, theoretical framework or simulations of the inter-play between economic activities, natural environment and human health. We encourage studies that provide critical and systematic assessments regarding costs and other impacts of current development policies and practices. It is expected that presentations and papers of this sessions will expand our knowledge and ultimately lead to improve actions to achieve better health, strong economies and sustainable environment.

Dr. Son Nghiem
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Son Nghiem is a senior research fellow at the Centre for Applied Health Economics, School of Medicine, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Dr Nghiem is an expert in applied health econometrics and health economics. His current research interest focuses on using routinely-collected health data to examine the progression of diseases and evaluate cost-effectiveness of health interventions. Dr Nghiem is also interested in applying big data and machine learning methods to build early prediction models to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of healthcare services. He has published more than 60 articles with an H-Index of 17, i-10 index of 29 and over 900 citations (October 2019; Scholar). Dr Nghiem has supervised to successful completion five PhD students.
Prof. Bach Tran
Johns Hopkins University
Baltimore, United States
Professor Bach Tran is Vice Head of Department of Health Economics at Hanoi Medical University, Vietnam, and Adjunct Professor at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, USA. His research interests include the application of epidemiological-economic models to explore the determinants of infectious diseases outbreaks, assess nations’ vulnerability, and identify effective system and human behavioural responses. He has extensive experience in research, surveillance and evaluation of global health threats in South-East Asia. Much of his work centers on determining cost-effective interventions, assessing health services and innovations, and strengthening health systems, particularly related to HIV/AIDS and emerging diseases. He is the winner of numerous international and domestic research awards, including the Hopkins Center for AIDS Research’s International Research Award and the Dang Van Ngu Memorial Award. He has been publishing frequently in highly regarded international journals in global health sciences, including The Lancet, Bulletin of the World Health Organization, AIDS and Behaviors,...
Dr. Bach Tran earned his PhD (2011) and completed a postdoctoral fellowship (2013) in Health Economics and Policy from the University of Alberta, Canada. He is an alumnus of the Inter Academy Medical Panel’s Young Physician Leaders program (2013). Dr. Bach Tran served as a Health Economist at the Institute of Health Economics, Canada (2013), and a research fellow of the International AIDS Society at the Johns Hopkins University, USA (2014). Since 2015, he is co-chair of the Global Health Innovations Network (GHIN) which aims to foster innovations, research and publications towards sustainable health and development in LMICs. Serving as Vice President of the Vietnam Young Physician Association, Dr Tran has also been a pioneer in promoting research and evidence-based medicine in the Vietnamese health care system.

Invited papers (2)
SPECIAL SESSION: Sustainable urban development: Water-Energy-Climate nexus
Session resume:

Nexus approaches to manage water, energy and climate systems are fundamental for the urban environment as part of the overarching goal of Sustainable Development of Energy, Water and Environment Systems (SDEWES). Water and energy are the most vital resources for urban development. Their lifecycles are interdependent, and also impact and are impacted by climate change, in a phenomenon defined as the Water-Energy-Climate nexus. In this context, there has been a tremendous increase in studies addressing the Water-Energy-Climate nexus in recent years.

Water-Energy-Climate nexus studies provide multidisciplinary frameworks to understand the synergies, trade-offs and opportunities to achieve sustainable development goals, e.g. clean water and sanitation, affordable and clean energy, climate action, to list a few. Multidisciplinary R&D activities related to the management of water, energy and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions are paramount for a prompt transition into green economies, and, thus, dissemination of novel ideas, communication and knowledge sharing on Water-Energy-Climate nexus play critical role in achieving sustainable urban development.

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Dr. Abel Silva Vieira
Griffith University
Gold Coast, Australia
Dr Abel Silva Vieira has 10 years of professional experience in infrastructure planning, energy efficiency, and water conservation. Since 2013, he has been working for City of Gold Coast Council as a Planning Engineer as part of the Local Government Infrastructure Plan (LGIP) project. His experience also extends to the private sector as a Consulting Engineer at Australian Water Environments (AWE) in 2009-2010, along with other project in Australia, Brazil, Ethiopia, Netherlands and Sweden. He acquired a PhD degree in 2019 from the Griffith School of Engineering and Built Environment, and a MSc degree in 2012 from the Civil Engineering Depart at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC). Dr Abel’s Honours thesis was undertaken during his exchange program at Linnaeus University in Sweden. His research focus includes the water-energy-climate nexus of conventional and alternative water supply systems and wastewater treatment systems, water heating systems, and strategic infrastructure planning. As part of his doctorate, he developed a renewable energy and energy efficiency framework taking into account environmental (carbon footprint), economic (financial feasibility) and societal (household characteristics) aspects in the context of the Water-Energy-Climate nexus.

Invited papers (8)
SPECIAL SESSION: Biofuels for sustainable futures
Session resume:

Increased use of biofuels in transport, energy and industry sectors will replace the dwindling fossil fuels and contribute to mitigate the climate change. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), biofuels could provide around 30% of all transportation fuels by 2050 and thereby avoid 2.1 Giga tonnes of CO2 eq emissions per year associated with fossil fuels consumption. In addition, biofuels can also contribute to energy security by diversifying the energy mix and by providing decentralised renewable energy generation and use.

To achieve the climate targets, especially in the short and medium terms, biofuels can play an important role. Advanced, or second generation, biofuels can be produced from non-food organic waste materials from industry, agriculture and municipality as well from the specially grown energy crops or algae and refined into biofuels for use in transportation or industry. Use of both advanced and secondary biofuels in industry, which require high operating temperatures and in long distance transportation such as shipping and aviation, where the added weight of batteries makes electrification impractical, biofuels are the best near term low-carbon renewable fuels. However, the main challenges for some countries for wider adoption of biofuels is the limited availability of low-cost biomass resource, and the high costs of advanced biomass to biofuel conversion technologies that are at various stages of development. Therefore, research and development aimed at accelerating advanced biofuels availability must address key challenges ranging from the sustainable generation and supply of biological feedstocks which takes into account life-cycle impacts and increasing competition for food, feed and material production, to demonstrating the economic feasibility of technologies to produce biofuels that meet current fuel specifications and that can be blended with existing fuels. The aim of this special session is to present topics in research, development, and demonstration of advanced and second-generation biofuels production to achieve performance breakthroughs and cost reductions with the potential to substantially lower GHG emissions.

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Dr. Prasad Kaparaju
Griffith University
Brisbane, Australia
Dr Prasad Kaparaju is a Senior Lecturer in Environmental Engineering at the School of Engineering and Built Environment, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Queensland Australia. Dr Kaparaju has 20 years of research experience in environmental biotechnology and bioprocess engineering and waste management. His current research areas includes biomass to biofuels conversion technology, anaerobic digestion, biomass pretreatment, biogas upgrading to bioCNG, biogas and biohydrogen production, and circular bioeconomy. Dr Kaparaju is leading Australian Renewable Energy Agency research project that seek to integration of biogas from sugarcane residues in the sugar milling industry to reduce fossil fuel usage and better utilise biomass resources for CO2-neutral transport biofuel and decentralised renewable energy generation. He has a rapidly growing citation trajectory with a H-Index of 29, i-10 index of 41 and over 3368 citations (September 2019; Scholar). He has received over USD $1.4M of external funding to date. He has averaged over 118 citations per year in his academic career. Dr Kaparaju was a recipient of EU FP7 Valorization of food waste to biogas: VALORGAS – EU 7th Framework Valorisation of food waste to biogas (2010-2013). Previously, Dr Kaparaju has worked as an academic and researcher in University of Jyvaskyla, Finland, Technical University of Denmark and University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and as visiting researcher in Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l'Environnement (LBE), Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, LBE-INRA, Narbonne, France and Arizona State University, USA. Dr Kaparaju is member of Bioenergy Australia and Member of Taskforce on Waste Management and Biogas in Australia. He was the Co-Chairman of International Conference on Sustainability in Energy and Buildings SEB-18, June 2018, Gold Coast and Conference secretary, 2nd International Conference in Anaerobic Digestion Technology, Cheng Mai, Thailand, June 2018. Dr Kaparaju has supervised to successful completion over 7 PhD/MPhil graduates to date and more than 50 Master students.

Invited papers (1)
SPECIAL SESSION: Integrated participatory systems approach for modelling socio-ecological systems
Session resume:

The proposed session will focus on modelling socio-ecological systems using principles of systems thinking, system dynamics and other integrative modelling approaches. In particular, we are interested in research where models have been developed and used for socio-ecological systems that integrate key drivers, processes and responses that interact within, and have feedback on, the system that is being investigated. Often, these models typically require the combination of knowledge and data from a variety of sources, including the participation and collaboration of researchers from diverse domains, decision-makers and (other) stakeholders.

We encourage submissions of abstracts that:

  • highlight the development and use of socio-ecological models that facilitate the exploration and evaluation of ‘wicked’ problems around resource-use;
  • incorporate innovation (e.g. smart technology  smartphones and tablets; immersive technology) in eliciting data and delivering research, particularly in the context of stakeholder engagement and tool delivery; and
  • facilitate participation/collaboration of researchers from diverse domains, decision-makers and (other) stakeholders.
Dr. Russell Richards
University of Queensland
Brisbane, Australia
Dr. Oz Sahin
Griffith University
Gold Coast City, Australia
Dr Oz Sahin is a Senior Research Fellow at the Griffith Climate Change Response Program. Since completing his PhD in the field of climate change adaptation and vulnerability assessment 2011, he has worked on numerous research projects with a range of large interdisciplinary teams. In his current role, he is responsible developing integrated risk assessment models working with a large team of experts. His research interests include integrated decision support systems using coupled system dynamics and GIS modelling, BN modelling, multiple criteria decision analysis and operational research methods. Dr Sahin has authored or co-authored more than 120 refereed publication outputs and research /consultancy reports.

Invited papers (13)



SDEWES INDEX
Benchmarking the performance of cities across energy, water and environment systems
related metrics presents an opportunity to trigger policy learning, action, and cooperation to bring cities closer to sustainable development.

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